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What the Catholic Church is Saying about Food

Catholic Church

  

The Waste of Food

Once our grandparents were very careful not to throw away any leftover food. Consumerism has led us to become accustomed to the superfluous and the daily waste of food, which we are sometimes no longer able to value correctly, as its value goes far beyond mere economic parameters. Note well, though, that the food we throw away is as if we had stolen it from the table of the poor or the hungry! I invite everyone to reflect on the problem of the loss and waste of food to identify ways and methods that, addressing this issue seriously, may be a vehicle for sharing and solidarity with the neediest. 
– Pope Francis, 2013


Responsibility of U.S. for World Food

Farm owners and farm workers are the immediate stewards of the natural resources required to produce the food that is necessary to sustain life. These resources must be understood as gifts of a generous God. When they are seen in that light and when the human race is perceived as a single moral community, we gain a sense of the substantial responsibility we bear as a nation for the world food system.
– U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, 1986


The Responsibility to Use Land Wisely

"Natural resources should be used in such a way that immediate benefits do not have a negative impact on living creatures, human and not, present and future…that human activity does not compromise the fruitfulness of the earth, for the benefit of people now and in the future.”
– Pope Benedict XVI, 2010


How Animals are Raised for Food Production is an Ethical Issue

"Catholic teaching about the stewardship of creation leads us to question certain farming practices, such as the operation of massive, confined, animal feeding operations. We believe that these operations should be carefully regulated and monitored so that environmental risks are minimized and animals are treated as creatures of God.”
– U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, 2003

Imagine if the Earth were divided equally among all of us. Each person would receive 4.5 acres. Now imagine that everything you need – food, energy, home, clothing, gadgets – must come from those 4.5 acres. But it takes 22.3 acres to maintain the average American lifestyle.There is a new way of observing Lent that helps us care for God’s creation by taking steps toward using only our fair share of its resources. Moving in the direction of 4.5 is essential for anyone walking in the footsteps of Jesus today.

Our Ministry

Lent 4.5 is a seven-week faith formation program which inspires and informs Christian communities on how to use the traditional Lenten disciplines of prayer, fasting and almsgiving to protect God’s creation, embrace Gospel justice and nurture spiritual fulfillment. It offers practical opportunities for people of faith to apply the values of Christian Simplicity to their everyday lives.


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